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USS Fleming DE 32 Sinking of I-362

The webmaster was contacted by a DESA member about the information related to Fleming's sinking of I-362.  Sources were quoted that show differing dates and DE ship information from my information.  In an effort to clarify the sinking of I-362, I present the following information from the Combined Fleet web site and from noted DE researcher Anne McCarthy.

23 May 1944:
The I-362 is completed at Mitsubishi's Kobe Yard as a Type D1 "Tei-gata" transport submarine, commissioned in the IJN and based in the Yokosuka Naval District. The I-362 is assigned to SubRon 3's SubDiv 11. LtCdr Nakajima Hidenosuke is the Commanding Officer.

15 August 1944:
Assigned to Rear Admiral Owada Noboru's (former CO of YAMASHIRO) SubRon 7.

21 August 1944:
Departs Yokosuka on a supply mission to Nauru Island.

13 September 1944:
Arrives at Nauru. Unloads supplies, then departs for Truk.

22 September 1944:
Departs Truk carrying 83 IJNAF airmen.

3 October 1944:
Arrives at Yokosuka.

24 October 1944:
Departs Yokosuka on a supply mission to Minami-Torishima (Marcus Island).

30 October 1944:
Arrives at Minami-Torishima. Unloads supplies, then departs for Yokosuka.

6 November 1944:
Arrives at Yokosuka for an overhaul.

1 January 1945:
The I-362 departs Yokosuka on a supply run via Truk to Mereyon Island. The I-362's estimated time of arrival is 21 January.

13 January 1945:
Eastern Carolines. LtCdr K. F. Burgess' USS FLEMING (DE-32) is on convoy duty as one of two escorts for a pair of merchant tankers bound from Ulithi to Eniwetok. The FLEMING makes radar contact with a surface target at a range of 14,000 yards. At 4,000 yards, the FLEMING makes a challenge but it goes unanswered. At 1,900 yards, the target fades from radar, but the
FLEMING acquires a clear sonar echo at the same range and bearing. She closes to 1,000 yards and illuminates the area with her port searchlight, but finds the area clear. The FLEMING makes a depth charge attack, then fires four barrages of Mark 10 "hedgehogs", each of twenty-four projector charges.

14 January 1945:
About midnight, after the fourth hedgehog attack, three underwater explosions are felt and heard. A deep rumbling blast shakes the FLEMING and damages her sound gear. Debris is sighted and a diesel oil slick forms on the surface. The submarine - probably the I-362 - sinks with all hands at 12-08N,154-27E.

15 March 1945:
Presumed lost off the Carolines.

10 April 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

Anne McCarthy states, "It can difficult to determine the accuracy of some WWII naval actions. Concerning Fleming, there is conflicting data, but it seems the corrected data is indeed correct."
The 1955 US Naval Chronology credits RICHARD M. ROWELL (DE-403) with sinking I-362 on 24 October 1944 and credits FLEMING with sinking RO-47 on 18 January 1945.
The 1969 corrected version of the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships credits FLEMING with sinking I-362 just after midnight 14 January 1945.
The 1976 version of the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships mentions only that ROWELL was attacking a Japanese submarine 26 October 1944.
The 2000 US Naval Chronology credits RICHARD M. ROWELL (DE-403) with sinking I-54 on 24 October 1944 and credits FLEMING with sinking I-362 on 13 January 1945.
CONWAY'S indicates I-362 was sunk on either 13 or 18 January 1945.

 

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